Jody Hice Committee Assignments In The House

Top Contributors, 2017 - 2018

ContributorTotalIndividualsPACs
House Freedom Fund$18,500$13,500$5,000
Janus Research$5,700$5,700$0
Ese Holdings LLC$5,400$5,400$0
Tmc Cranes LLC$5,400$5,400$0
AFLAC Inc$5,000$0$5,000

Top Industries, 2017 - 2018

IndustryTotalIndividualsPACs
Retired$25,900$25,900$0
Leadership PACs$20,500$13,500$7,000
Real Estate$14,900$13,900$1,000
Railroads$8,000$1,000$7,000
Oil & Gas$7,700$2,700$5,000

Total Raised vs. Average Raised

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NOTE: All the numbers on this page are for the 2017 - 2018 election cycle and based on Federal Election Commission data released electronically on 03/13/18 for Fundraising totals, Source of Funds and Total Raised vs Average, and on 02/20/18 for Top Contributors and Industries.  ("Help! The numbers don't add up...")

WHY DON'T THE NUMBERS ADD UP?

Sometimes it's hard to make apple-to-apple comparisons across some of the pages in a candidate's profile. Here's why:

Summary numbers - specifically "Total Raised and Spent" and "PAC/Individual Split" - are based on summary reports filed by the candidates with the Federal Election Commission. All other numbers in these profiles ("Quality of Disclosure," "Geography" and "Special Interests") are derived from detailed FEC reports that itemize all contributions of $200 or more.

There is also a time lag in posting the information. While summary numbers are reported almost immediately by the FEC -- and listed quickly on OpenSecrets -- processing and analyzing the detailed records takes much longer. For that reason, summary numbers are usually higher (and more current) than the numbers based on detailed records.

HOW CURRENT ARE THESE FIGURES?

The figures in these profiles are taken from databases uploaded by the FEC to the internet on the first day of every month. Those databases are only as current as the FEC has been able to compile by that date (see the note above about lag times for data entry).

The Center updates figures for "Total Raised and Spent" and for "PAC/Individual Split" a few days after the first of the month. The remaining figures - based on detailed contribution data - is updated by the Center after the 20th of every month. This gives us time to analyze the contributions and categorize them by industry and interest group.

The organizations themselves did not donate, rather the money came from the organizations' PACs, their individual members or employees or owners, and those individuals' immediate families. Organization totals include subsidiaries and affiliates.

Why (and How) We Use Donors' Employer/Occupation Information

The organizations listed as "Top Contributors" reached this list for one of two reasons: either they gave through a political action committee sponsored by the organization, or individuals connected with the organization contributed directly to the candidate.

Under federal law, all contributions over $200 must be itemized and the donor's occupation and employer must be requested and disclosed, if provided. The Center uses that employer/occupation information to identify the donor's economic interest. We do this in two ways:

  • First, we apply a code to the contribution, identifying the industry. Totals for industries (and larger economic sectors) can be seen in each candidate and race profile, and in the Industry Profile section of the OpenSecrets website.
  • Second, we standardize the name of the donor's employer. If enough contributions came in from people connected with that same employer, the organization's name winds up on the Top Contributor list.

Of course, it is impossible to know either the economic interest that made each individual contribution possible or the motivation for each individual giver. However, the patterns of contributions provide critical information for voters, researchers and others. That is why Congress mandated that candidates and political parties request employer information from contributors and publicly report it when the contributor provides it.

In some cases, a cluster of contributions from the same organization may indicate a concerted effort by that organization to "bundle" contributions to the candidate. In other cases—both with private companies and with government agencies, non-profits and educational institutions—the reason for the contributions may be completely unrelated to the organization.

Showing these clusters of contributions from people associated with particular organizations provides a valuable—and unique—way of understanding where a candidate is getting his or her financial support. Knowing those groups is also useful after the election, as issues come before Congress and the administration that may affect those organizations and their industries.

METHODOLOGY

The figures profiled here include money from two sources: These contributors were either the sponsors of a PAC that gave to the politician, or they were listed as an individual donor's employer. Donors who give more than $200 to any federal candidate, PAC or party committee must list their occupation and employer. Based on that information, the donor is given an economic code. These totals are conservative, as not all of the individual contributions have yet been classified by the Center.

In cases where two or more people from the same family contributed, the income-earner's occupation/employer is assigned to all non-wage earning family members. If, for instance, Henry Jones lists his employer as First National Bank, his wife Matilda lists "Homemaker" and 12-year old Tammy shows up as "Student," the Center would identify all their contributions as being related to the "First National Bank" since that's the source of the family's income.

Although individual contributions are generally categorized based on the donor's occupation/employer, in some cases individuals may be classified instead as ideological donors. A contribution to a candidate may be given an ideological code, rather than an economic code, if the contributor gives to an ideological political action committee AND the candidate has received money from PACs representing that same ideological interest.

Feel free to distribute or cite this material, but please credit the Center for Responsive Politics. For permission to reprint for commercial uses, such as textbooks, contact the Center: info[at]crp.org

Jody Brownlow Hice (born April 22, 1960) is an American politician, syndicated radio show host, political activist, and Southern Baptist pastor who is the U.S. Representative for Georgia's 10th congressional district. He was elected in 2014.

Early life[edit]

Hice is a native of Atlanta and received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Asbury College in Wilmore, Kentucky, a Master of Divinity degree from Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary in Fort Worth, Texas, and a Doctor of Ministry degree from Luther Rice Seminary in Atlanta, Georgia.[1]

Hice first served as senior pastor of Bethlehem First Baptist Church, until April 2010[2] in Bethlehem, Georgia. In addition, he served as first vice president of the Georgia Baptist Convention (2004–05) and Professor of Preaching at Luther Rice Seminary. Hice served as senior pastor at The Summit Church, a Southern Baptist church, in Loganville, Georgia from 2011 until December 2013, when he stepped down to run for office.

The Jody Hice Show[edit]

During the battle between the ACLU and Barrow County, Georgia, regarding the public display of the Ten Commandments in the County Courthouse, Hice was asked by a local radio station to provide weekly updates and to address various other issues.[3]

From that weekly program a daily show, Let Freedom Ring, which was originally heard on WIMO 1300 AM, Bethlehem, Georgia was born. The show is heard on about 400 stations,[4] the show focuses on Constitutional, moral, and religious liberty issues.[citation needed]

U.S. House of Representatives[edit]

2014 election[edit]

The Congressional Seat for Georgia's 10th Congressional District opened up when the sitting representative, Paul Broun, announced his bid for U.S. Senate in 2014.[5] Hice was the second to formally enter the race on April 15, 2013, citing government spending as his foremost concern.[6] Hice was soon joined by 5 other candidates, leading to primary election of 7 for the open seat. Hice placed first in the primary on May 20, 2014 with 34% of the vote, followed closely by his run-off opponent Mike Collins who won 33% of the vote.[7]

With no candidate winning 50% of the vote, a run-off campaign was issued between the top two candidates, Hice and Mike Collins. The close race quickly grew heated amid accusations of campaign sign theft from both sides and reports of supporters being harassed at debates.[8] Hice ultimately won the run-off, grabbing 54% of the vote.[9]

Hice faced a Democratic opponent in November election, which he won (66.52%-33.48%) in a GOP wave on November 4, 2014.[10]

Committee assignments[edit]

Political positions[edit]

Economic issues[edit]

Budget & economy[edit]

Hice supports a balanced budget amendment.[14]

Government reform[edit]

Hice supports auditing the federal reserve and its activities around mortgages. He co-sponsored the Federal Reserve Transparency Act.[14]

Tax reform[edit]

Hice favors tax reform and voted in support of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017.[15] He claims the new legislature creates a "competitive and fair tax system." He says it will create an improved economy, more opportunities, and "keep more money in the pockets of hardworking families and individuals." He also believes “It will also encourage American businesses to keep their jobs and revenue here, and our job creators will once again be competitive internationally.”[16]

Social issues[edit]

Abortion[edit]

Hice is pro-life. He opposes abortions being used for race or sex selection. He believes that life begins at fertilization or cloning. He opposes family planning assistance that includes abortion.[17]

Cannabis[edit]

Hice has a "D" rating from NORML for his voting history regarding cannabis-related causes. Hice is opposed to veterans having access to medical marijuana if recommended by their Veterans Health Administration doctor and if it is legal for medicinal purposes in their state of residence.[18]

LGBT issues[edit]

Hice opposes gay marriage.[19] He particularly drew criticism from an episode of his radio show in which he voiced his concerns about banning conversion therapy. In this show he claimed homosexuality is a choice and is indulging a sinful tendency, much like alcoholism or drug abuse.[20]

Religious rights[edit]

Christianity

In September 2008, Hice was one of 33 pastors across America who participated in "Pulpit Freedom Sunday",[21] an effort that challenged an Internal Revenue Service code threatening churches and pastors with loss of tax-exempt status and criminal behavior if they address political issues from the pulpit. In that sermon, Hice endorsed SenatorJohn McCain for President. The IRS never publicly responded to the event, and Pulpit Freedom Sunday has since grown to include over 450 churches.[22]

Hice has argued that Christians have been "tricked" into a "false belief" in separation of church and state.[23][24]

Islam

National media outlets have drawn attention to Jody Hice's views on Islam regarding his book, A Call to Reclaim America, in which he claims that Islam is not only a religion, but a geo-political structure and is therefore not deserving of First Amendment protection.[25] Hice, in his book It's Now or Never, also quoted former U.S. general Jerry Boykin as stating that there is a Muslim Brotherhood plot to take over the United States.[26]

Women's rights[edit]

In a 2004 interview with the Athens Banner-Herald, the largest newspaper in Hice's district, Hice stated that a woman had to be "within the authority of her husband" if she wanted to run for public office.[27]

References[edit]

  1. ^"Bio of Jody Hice". Retrieved 15 December 2017. 
  2. ^"Jody Hice Pastors First Baptist Church of Bethlehem, GA". 
  3. ^"The Jody Hice Show". jodyhice.com. Retrieved February 2, 2018. 
  4. ^"Current Stations Airing The Jody Hice Show". Retrieved 15 December 2017. 
  5. ^Killough, Ashley (February 6, 2013). "Georgia Rep. Paul Broun to run for Senate". CNN. 
  6. ^Galloway, Jim (April 15, 2013). "Jody Hice enters GOP race to replace Paul Broun". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 
  7. ^"Ga Election Results". GA Secretary of State Page. Retrieved February 2, 2018. 
  8. ^Cochran, Kelsey (July 20, 2014). "Hice, Collins campaign heats up with reports of sign thefts, 'shenanigans'". Athens Banner-Herald. 
  9. ^"Georgia – Summary Vote Results". Associated Press. Retrieved February 2, 2018. 
  10. ^"covnews.com, Jody Hice wins seat in U.S. House, November 4, 2014". covnews.com. Retrieved December 15, 2017. 
  11. ^"What is the House Freedom Caucus, and who's in it?". Pew research center. 20 October 2015. Retrieved 26 October 2017. 
  12. ^"Member List". Republican Study Committee. Retrieved 21 December 2017. 
  13. ^"Committees : Congressman Jody Hice". hice.house.gov. Retrieved 2018-01-25. 
  14. ^ ab"Doug Collins on Budget & Economy". On the Issues. Retrieved 25 December 2017. 
  15. ^Almukhtar, Sarah (19 December 2017). "How Each House Member Voted on the Tax Bill". The New York Times. Retrieved 25 December 2017. 
  16. ^Yeomans, Curt. "POLITICAL NOTEBOOK: Gwinnett's Republican representatives in Washington celebrate tax bill passage". Gwinnett Daily Post. Retrieved December 25, 2017. 
  17. ^"Doug Collins on Abortion". On The Issues. Retrieved December 25, 2017. 
  18. ^"Georgia Scorecard". NORML. Retrieved December 25, 2017. 
  19. ^Jody Hice is likely headed to Congress, Sean Sullivan, 23 July 2014, Washington Post
  20. ^Sarlin, Benjy. "Anti-Islam pastor Jody Hice wins Georgia primary". MSNBC. 
  21. ^"Jody Hice Returns To National Spotlight With Presidential Endorsement". onlineathens.com. Retrieved February 2, 2018. 
  22. ^"Churches await IRS response after protest". MSNBC. April 24, 2009. Retrieved 2009-05-20. 
  23. ^"Rep. Jody Hice: Church-State Separation Encourages Corruption". Right Wing Watch. People for the American Way. 
  24. ^"Congressman Jody Hice: Christians 'Tricked' Into Believing Separation Of Church And State". Fox News Radio. Archived from the original on 2015-06-21. 
  25. ^Bookman, Jay (June 23, 2014). "Is the First Amendment only for Christians?". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. 
  26. ^Hice, Jody. It's Now or Never, pg. 155
  27. ^Hatcher, Beth. "Influx of women into government hits home". onlineathens.com. Retrieved December 15, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Jody Hice.

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