Gw Essay Topic

If you want to get in, the first thing to look at is the acceptance rate. This tells you how competitive the school is and how serious their requirements are.

The acceptance rate at George Washington University is 46%. For every 100 applicants, 46 are admitted.

This means the school is moderately selective. The school expects you to meet their requirements for GPA and SAT/ACT scores, but they're more flexible than other schools. If you exceed their requirements, you have an excellent chance of getting in. But if you don't, you might be one of the unlucky minority that gets a rejection letter.

Many schools specify a minimum GPA requirement, but this is often just the bare minimum to submit an application without immediately getting rejected.

The GPA requirement that really matters is the GPA you need for a real chance of getting in. For this, we look at the school's average GPA for its current students.

The average GPA at George Washington University is 3.8.

(Most schools use a weighted GPA out of 4.0, though some report an unweighted GPA. This school did not officially report its average GPA, but we've estimated it here using data from over 1,000 schools.)

With a GPA of 3.8, George Washington University requires you to be near the top of your class, and well above average. Your transcript should show mostly A's. Ideally, you will also have taken several AP or IB classes to show that you can handle academics at a college level.

If you're currently a junior or senior, your GPA is hard to change in time for college applications. If your GPA is at or below the school average of 3.8, you'll need a higher SAT or ACT score to compensate. This will help you compete effectively against other applicants who have higher GPAs than you.

Each school has different requirements for standardized testing. Most schools require the SAT or ACT, and many also require SAT subject tests.

George Washington University has indicated that the SAT or ACT is required for some applicants. This can mean a few things:

  • The SAT or ACT is optional, but recommended by the school to improve your application chances.
  • You might be able to get admitted with through your GPA or class ranking alone.
  • Only specific departments at the school require the SAT or ACT.
If you're applying to this and other schools, it's safest to take the SAT or ACT. This will maximize your chance of getting into the best school possible, especially since most other students will be submitting their scores.

George Washington University SAT Requirements

Many schools say they have no SAT score cutoff, but the truth is that there is a hidden SAT requirement. This is based on the school's average score.

Average SAT: 1370 (Old: 1942)

The average SAT score composite at George Washington University is a 1370 on the 1600 SAT scale.

On the old 2400 SAT, this corresponds to an average SAT score of 1942.

This score makes George Washington University Moderately Competitive for SAT test scores.


George Washington University SAT Score Analysis (New 1600 SAT)

The 25th percentile New SAT score is 1280, and the 75th percentile New SAT score is 1450. In other words, a 1280 on the New SAT places you below average, while a 1450 will move you up to above average.

Here's the breakdown of new SAT scores by section:

SectionAverage25th Percentile75th Percentile
Math670620730
Reading343237
Writing353336
Composite137012801450

George Washington University SAT Score Analysis (Old 2400 SAT)

The 25th percentile Old SAT score is 1790, and the 75th percentile SAT score is 2080. In other words, a 1790 on the Old SAT places you below average, while a 2080 puts you well above average.

Here's the breakdown of old SAT scores by section:

SectionAverage25th Percentile75th Percentile
Math651600700
Reading641590690
Writing650600690
Composite194217902080

SAT Score Choice Policy

The Score Choice policy at your school is an important part of your testing strategy.

George Washington University has the Score Choice policy of "All Scores."

This means that George Washington University requires you to send all SAT scores you've ever taken to their office.

This sounds daunting, but most schools don't actually consider all your scores equally. For example, if you scored an 1300 on one test and a 1500 on another, they won't actually average the two tests.

More commonly, the school will take your highest score on a single test date. Even better, some schools form a Superscore - that is, they take your highest section score across all your test dates and combine them.

Some students are still worried about submitting too many test scores. They're afraid that George Washington University will look down on too many attempts to raise your score. But how many is too many?

From our research and talking to admissions officers, we've learned that 4-6 tests is a safe number to submit. The college understands that you want to have the best chance of admission, and retaking the test is a good way to do this. Within a reasonable number of tests, they honestly don't care how many times you've taken it. They'll just focus on your score.

If you take it more than 6 times, colleges start wondering why you're not improving with each test. They'll question your study skills and ability to improve.

But below 6 tests, we strongly encourage retaking the test to maximize your chances. If your SAT score is currently below a 1370, we strongly recommend that you consider prepping for the SAT and retaking it. You don't have much to lose, and you can potentially raise your score and significantly boost your chances of getting in.


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George Washington University ACT Requirements

Just like for the SAT, George Washington University likely doesn't have a hard ACT cutoff, but if you score too low, your application will get tossed in the trash.

Average ACT: 29

The average ACT score at George Washington University is 29. This score makes George Washington University Moderately Competitive for ACT scores.

The 25th percentile ACT score is 27, and the 75th percentile ACT score is 31.

Even though George Washington University likely says they have no minimum ACT requirement, if you apply with a 27 or below, you'll have a very hard time getting in, unless you have something else very impressive in your application. There are so many applicants scoring 29 and above that a 27 will look academically weak.

ACT Score Sending Policy

If you're taking the ACT as opposed to the SAT, you have a huge advantage in how you send scores, and this dramatically affects your testing strategy.

Here it is: when you send ACT scores to colleges, you have absolute control over which tests you send. You could take 10 tests, and only send your highest one. This is unlike the SAT, where many schools require you to send all your tests ever taken.

This means that you have more chances than you think to improve your ACT score. To try to aim for the school's ACT requirement of 29 and above, you should try to take the ACT as many times as you can. When you have the final score that you're happy with, you can then send only that score to all your schools.

ACT Superscore Policy

By and large, most colleges do not superscore the ACT. (Superscore means that the school takes your best section scores from all the test dates you submit, and then combines them into the best possible composite score). Thus, most schools will just take your highest ACT score from a single sitting.

We weren't able to find the school's exact ACT policy, which most likely means that it does not Superscore. Regardless, you can choose your single best ACT score to send in to George Washington University, so you should prep until you reach our recommended target ACT score of 29.


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SAT/ACT Writing Section Requirements

Both the SAT and ACT have a Writing section that includes an essay.

George Washington University considers the SAT/ACT Writing section optional and may not include it as part of their admissions consideration. You don't need to worry too much about Writing for this school, but other schools you're applying to may require it.


SAT Subject Test Requirements

Schools vary in their SAT subject test requirements. Typically, selective schools tend to require them, while most schools in the country do not.

We did not find information that George Washington University requires SAT subject tests, and so most likely it does not. At least 6 months before applying, you should still doublecheck just to make sure, so you have enough time to take the test.



This prompt can be misleading in the sense that it may cause you to write an essay that doesn’t focus on showing the admissions office more of who you are. Avoid spending too much of your essay word count writing solely about the other person. One strategy could be to write your essay first without mentioning them, then write a couple of sentences on them and find where would be best to incorporate them afterwards (without sounding choppy). Be careful to find a balance between addressing the prompt and not letting your comments on your mentor take over.

 

Another point to consider is whether this mentor is already writing you a letter of recommendation. If so, it’s highly possible that they will already write about this challenge in their letter for you and end up making this essay somewhat repetitive. In that case, you may want to consider other people who played supporting roles for you.

 

Ironically, the most significant challenge involved with addressing this prompt, besides writing about your mentor, is coming up with an appropriate and significant challenge to center the essay around. If you have gone through personal issues that you don’t feel comfortable sharing, you are by no means obligated to write about them or to even choose this prompt.

 

On the other hand, if you need to spend more than a minute after reading the prompt questioning whether you have had a challenge worth writing about, we urge you to avoid arbitrarily choosing something and over emphasizing its significance to you.

 

For example, if you were involved in competitive groups such as Debate, DECA, FBLA, SkillsUSA, MUN etc., you could write generally about feeling grateful for the time and effort your advisors or mentors put into getting you through losses and failures inevitable to these types of clubs.

 

However, picking a more specific challenge that you have experienced instead will typically engage the readers more since you won’t need to write in abstract or vague terms. For example, you could write about how your mentor was able to calm you down right before an important competition as you were experiencing extreme anxiety or dealing with an intense family/personal issue. This could be a moment that really fits the theme of writing about someone providing support and wisdom through difficulty while still highlighting your participation in that activity.

 

Getting creative with the syntax of this essay could also greatly increase the originality. For example, you could write the essay in the form of a thank you letter addressing your person of importance, or you could write about them more abstractly before revealing who they are at the end of the essay. Think about how authors write forwards in their books as short inspirations for how to credit others for the help they received from them.

 

Also, if you happen to have had a struggle during high school that at any point impacted your ability to perform academically, this is a good space to provide a clarifying narrative (while avoiding making excuses).

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